40 years supporting galleries and artists
Spotlight

Artwork of the week: Bauhaus Stairs, 1931, Oskar Schlemmer

The Bauhaus building was a beautifully calm and spatially liberating modern building. This painting of students solemnly acceding its staircase was created in the wake of the school’s forced closure. Though Nazis condemned the movement – and everything the school stood for – its creative legacy lives on through this poignant piece. Join us as we take a closer look at the painting, now revered as Schlemmer’s most celebrated work. 

Inspiration

Spotlight

Although he is renowned for his war-torn landscapes, which revealed the brutal effects of World War I and II with devastating honesty, English painter Paul Nash (1889–1946) also created several surrealist – and enigmatic – paintings inspired by the English countryside.

Spotlight

Openly gay and working during the height of the sexual revolution in 1980s New York, street artist Keith Haring felt compelled to speak out about the AIDs epidemic that gripped the city. Building awareness about the deadly disease – which he himself contracted and sadly succumbed to aged just 31 – Haring produced this poster to promote safe sex.

Spotlight

Beneath a busy composition lies a welter of symbolism. Gilded gold leopards, jaguars, and white-bearded monkeys follow Greek goddess Diana and her nymphs on a hunt. Originally created in 1926 by Scottish Art Nouveau artist Robert Burns (1869–1941), this highly decorative painting was part of an impressive first floor redesign for Crawford’s Tea Rooms in Edinburgh.

Meet the Artist

Join us as we catch up with Hastings-based abstract landscape painter Louise Body to discuss fisherman’s smocks, juggling work and home life, and her previous career as a wallpaper designer. 

Spotlight

Christina’s World is one of the most iconic – and most mysterious – American realist paintings of the twentieth century. The meaning of Andrew Wyeth’s painting changes dramatically when we learn about his subject, Christina Olson, who has captivated and haunted critics for decades.

Spotlight

‘Don’t look back, ooh, a new day is breakin’ cried Bob Dylan in 1965. As we usher in a new year filled with hope and positivity, we’re thrilled to announce Don’t Look Back as our very first Artwork of the week. When it was released, the film broke box office records and is considered a classic of both documentary and rock filmmaking. It has a fascinating story to tell... 

Trends & Ideas

The past year has been filled with a range of exciting new King & McGaw launches. We asked our in-house curatorial team to reflect on the their 2021 highlights and here are some of their thoughts.  

The Edit

Party People Collection

Curated by our in-house experts, these jubilant works are just the tonic for art lovers and enthusiasts. Discover celebratory works by pop art prince Andy Warhol, luxurious lifestyle designs by Art Deco artist A. M. Cassandre, as well as countless vintage posters and photographs from world-leading museum archives and galleries.

This holiday season, we’re taking a closer look at some of our most popular prints – all under £100 – our customers add to their wish lists. From iconic photography to landscapes by leading contemporary painters, each of these wonderful artworks has a fascinating story to tell.

Gifts

From screen prints inspired by nineteenth-century poetry to figurative paintings channeling ancient Greek muses, each of these wonderful artworks has a fascinating story to tell.

Spotlight

From ancient Peruvian masks at British Museum to visionary paintings, documentary photography, fashion, film and sculpture by Caribbean artists at Tate, there’s a whole host of exciting exhibitions to see this holiday season.

This holiday season, we’ve curated a selection of rare artworks our customers wish for most. Can you guess which artworks come out on top?

Gifts

This holiday season, we’ve curated a selection of iconic artworks our customers wish for most. Can you guess which artworks come out on top?

Spotlight

Before spearheading the Pop Art movement in the 1960s, Andy Warhol made a name for himself creating illustrations for some of New York’s most prestigious magazines. The route to his success was not easy though. Often overlooked, this exceptionally creative period in his life is a fascinating prequel to his iconic pop art aesthetic.